The Basic Steps to Perfect Golf
Masterfiles

 

Sequence of Movements. ( Changed 05/09/2018)


It is important to understand is that the golf swing is broken down into three sections and each section of the swing has its own "sequence of movements"

Therefore maintain the back swing, the down swing and the follow through as individual movements and you will begin to understand how the professional golfer perform the golf swing.


Back swing

The back swing movement consists of rotating the shoulders and the arms to the end of the back swing movement whilst held firmly together as a solid one piece upper body unit but also whilst both feet remain firmly on the ground.

(See Pete Cowen`s -"Axe Drill"- When site comes up, click on the sites "home page" for the video.)

 

It is the movements of the hips that initiate the down swing movement and then the two parts rotate together into the down swing and the follow through movement.

 

Down Swing

The down swing movement is initiated by applying pressure to the left foot to the ground and simultaneously forcing the hips to rotate towards the target area and also forcing the hips to pivot.

As soon as the hips begin to rotate towards the target area it increases the torsion of the muscles of the whole body and when the torsion is at its maximum the upper body unit will be forced to follow the hip movement and begin to rotate around the central core of the spine at that point you also begin to force the upper body unit to rotate, subsequently the rotational movement of the upper body unit pull the arms along.

The movement of the arms pull the club head in its wake and as the down swing reaches its conclusion the arms begin to accelerate the club head through the contact area.


IMPORTANT INFORMATION.

At no time in the down swing / follow through movement must you physically attempt to rotate the upper body unit independently of the rotational movement of the hips as soon as the torsion of the muscles reach their maximum, the two parts rotate in tandem.


Therefore the down swing movement must be seen as a series of individual movements that come together to accelerate the club head into the back of the ball.

At the precise moment the club head makes contact with the ball, the follow through movement begins.

At the precise moment the club head makes contact with the ball, the head must be positioned so that the left eye is slightly behind the ball, the hands must not be ahead of the original address position and the weight of the body predominantly over the left leg and the hips facing at approximately 45 degrees towards the target area.

 

Therefore the golfer has to synchronised the whole swing movement so that the club head makes contact with the ball at the precise moment the hands return to the original address position, but what is paramount is that the head must remain slightly behind the ball and the upper body angles must be maintained whilst the eyes are fully focussed on the ball..

This sequence ends as soon as the hands and the club head are back at the original address position.


Contact and follow through.

This is the critical part of the golf swing, because during the down swing movement, the movement of the hips and the upper body unit were simply carried out in order to ensure that at the impact position the hands have returned to the original address position and simultaneously the club head makes contact with the ball.

At the impact position, the next "sequence of movements" begins.


Therefore as soon as the club head makes contact with the ball, the right arm is forced into the fully straightened position, thus keeping the club head square to the target line for that extra millisecond after the ball has been struck, whilst simultaneously the whole body continues to quickly turn to fully face the target area - at the same speed that the club head moves through the contact area
.

(You cannot turn the body to face the target area too quickly once the club head strikes the ball.)

However in order to perform the golf swing successfully, the head must remain slightly behind the ball position and in the Fixed Frontal condition and the upper body angles must be maintained until well after the ball has been struck and you must maintain your focus on the ball until it is struck.

 

 

 

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